New England Living TV: Historic Hingham Home Tour

Historic New England charm and coastal views attracted homeowners Ed and Beth to this Hingham home. The original home, built in 1905, was very large, and at the time the homeowners worried it wouldn’t sell, so they split it in half. Now the other half belongs to Ed and Beth’s next door neighbors.

Ed and Beth are particularly drawn to homes from the early 1900s, and this is their fourth renovation project of a house from that era. “The style we really like and the homes were built really well around this time and lend themselves to renovation,” says Ed. But the projects aren’t without their challenges.

Throughout the century, the home had been updated, and when Ed and Beth moved in, the floor plan wasn’t open enough, the kitchen was off in another section of the house, and stuck to the walls was a variety of wallpaper from different eras. Still they waited a few months before making any big changes. “We actually bought the home and camped out for a summer,” says Ed. “I always recommend that because you get to really understand how to use the home.”
Now the kitchen takes center stage. It’s bright and open and the windows frame coastal scenes of boats going out to sea and returning to the harbor. Islands and World’s End, local conservation area, are across the way.

Upstairs in the spacious master bedroom the couple can watch the water’s daily moods and in the master bathroom separate vanities are divided by the shower. 

Ed and Beth saved a few period details throughout. The carpenter restored and reused the railing that winds up the staircase. On the third floor, the home’s original doors still have glass doorknobs. Also, the architect suggested that a home of this size would typically open to the main street in the early twentieth century, so the homeowners moved the entrance and created a traditional foyer.

But that’s just a taste of this gorgeous house. See the full layout, learn more about renovations, and meet a local chef and artist in Episode 1 of Season 1.

Design by Architect Brian Cavanaugh | Art by Page Pearson Railsback

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