10 Places We Love

We know from experience that there are countless amazing things to see and do on Cape Cod. Here are a few places to visit that we’re sure will make your stay especially unforgettable. Enjoy!


 

  1. Town of Sandwich Boardwalk is one of the most picturesque places on the Cape. Close to the center of town, the 1,350-foot boardwalk offers views of marshlands, the ocean and nesting birds’ habitats, plus it is the perfect place to witness incredible sunrises and sunsets. Located at Town Beach. Take Town Neck Road to Wood Avenue in Sandwich. There is a fee to park.



  2. Wellfleet Drive-In, open from late May through mid-September, runs double features every night in the summertime. Built in 1957, it’s one of the few remaining area drive-ins still in business. The 100-by-44-foot screen has Dolby surround sound, and there are a playground and snack bar, too! This is the perfect family activity.
    51 State Hwy., Route 6, Wellfleet.



  3. Nickerson State Park in Brewster takes you far away from the sand dunes and salt marshes of the Cape, if only for a little while. Here, lush woods surround you, and there are eight crystal-clear, freshwater kettle ponds. Nickerson’s 1,900 square acres offer more than 400 campsites, hiking and biking trails, fishing, kayaking, canoeing and other recreational programs. The ponds are stocked, so bring your poles! Route 6A, Brewster.



  4. Woods Hole Science Aquarium, established in 1885, is the country’s oldest marine aquarium. Here, you can see and learn about non-releasable harbor seals and animals of the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic waters. Watch the staff feed animals, or try out the touch tanks filled with lobsters, quahogs, horseshoe crabs, hermit crabs, starfish and more. 166 Water St., Woods Hole.



  5. Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge, established in 1944 in Chatham, provides a resting, nesting and feeding habitat for migratory birds. The refuge’s 7,604 acres encompass diverse habitats of ocean, salt and freshwater marshes, dunes and freshwater ponds. More than 10 species of migratory birds nest here, including the second largest nesting colony of common terns on the Atlantic seaboard, at over 8,000 pairs.



  6. Cape Cod Beer offers free tours of the brewery once a day at 11 a.m., Monday through Saturday. Here, you can taste local beer at its finest, including Cape Cod Red, Porter, IPA, Beach Blond Ale and many seasonals. Tastings take place throughout the day during regular hours (and yes, you must be 21 to sample the beer). 1336 Phinney’s Ln., Hyannis.



  7. Taylor Bray Farm, in Yarmouth Port, has been around since the days of Plymouth Colony. The site was even occupied seasonally by Native American people at least 3,600 years ago. Livestock like goats, sheep, chickens and Scottish Highland cattle all live here, but that’s not all you’ll find. Walk out on the boardwalk into Black Flats Marsh where you can see Chapin Beach Dunes to the left and Cape Cod Bay beyond. Time your visit for one of the farm festivals, see ongoing archeological work or volunteer. There’s always something to do on the farm.



  8. Shining Sea Bikeway was named for the line in the song “America the Beautiful,” which was written by Falmouth native Katharine Lee Bates. The 10.7-mile bike path stretches from County Road in North Falmouth all the way to the Steamship Authority parking lot in Woods Hole. It hugs the coast, offering stunning scenery, trees and flowers, and is ideal for casual and beginner cyclists.



  9. Pilgrim Monument was built between 1907 and 1910 to commemorate the Mayflower Pilgrims’ first landing in the New World in Provincetown, in November 1620. Millions of visitors and generations of local residents have admired and climbed the 252-foot granite Pilgrim Monument.



  10. Chatham Lighthouse sits on the grounds of an active Coast Guard Station, near the “elbow” of the Cape. Tours are available during open house dates offered by the Coast Guard Auxilliary. Climbing the lighthouse requires you to be able to walk up 44 steps, followed by eight steps on a ladder. If you would prefer not to climb, you’re welcome to visit the base of the lighthouse and learn more about its history.
    37 Main St., Chatham. 

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